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The Flour Mill

Sudbury Living Magazine July 15, 2014 Neighbourhoods No Comments on The Flour Mill

Silos, Donovan. Photo By Marg Seregelyi        2012

The Flour Mill has its own distinctive landmark: the six yellow silos of the former Manitoba and Ontario Flour Mill company. They are more than 100 years old.

 

Immediately north of downtown Sudbury is the Flour Mill or Moulin-a-Fleur. It is centred on Notre-Dame Ave. and Kathleen St. and includes neighhourhoods from Jogues St. to Wilma St. and the Flour Mill business area north of Wilma to Pioneer Manor. The Flour Mill is adjacent to Cambrian Heights where Collège Boréal, Theatre du Nouvel Ontario and École Secondaire Macdonald-Cartier are located.

The origin of “French Town” dates back to 1894 when the francophone community began to build homes on Jesuit-owned land. It’s still considered the heart of Sudbury’s franco-Ontarian community. In recent years, it has become a popular with young families as the homes are attractively affordable and centrally located to downtown and New Sudbury.

The Flour Mill has its own distinctive landmark: the six yellow silos of the former Manitoba and Ontario Flour Mill company. The silos are more than 100 years old and have persevered. Perhaps for this reason, they are strongly associated with the city’s French-speaking community.

There are a large number of thriving locally-owned businesses and chains such as Leon’s and The Brick on the Notre Dame strip that make it a popular area for shopping.

The origin of “French Town” dates back to 1894 when the francophone community began to build homes on land that had been owned by the Jesuits. The house at 305 Murray St. is believed to be the first house in the Flour Mill.

In 2010 Flour Mill resident and historian Jeannine Larcher Lalande was honoured with a Lifetime Achievement Certificate from the Ontario Heritage Trust for her passion to collect and record her neighbourhood’s history.

Among her many achievements was the initiation of the city-wide Sudbury Blueberry Festival in the mid-1980s. She was assisted by former mayor Peter Wong.

“I once received a story from Mr. St. Germain, who said there were many large families who struggled with finances in the Flour Mill area. The regular driver of the street car, Pat Savard, knew this and would let the kids onto the car for free when they were going swimming. That is just an indication of the sense of community there was then,” she told Northern Life at the time.

Lalande documented the history of about 150 Flour Mill francophone families in five large binders.

In recent years, this proud working class neighbourhood has become a popular with young families as the homes are attractively affordable and centrally located to downtown and New Sudbury.

 

Junction Creek Waterway Walk
(Tom Davies to the Flour Mill)

The walkway is an oasis of nature that runs parallel to busy Notre Dame Ave. Enter at Ray Hnatyshyn Park on the corner of Elm St and Notre Dame. Walk along Junction Creek to Percy Playground near the Flour Mill Silos. Enjoy the serenity of the Ukrainian Altanka, a small enclosed garden that is open from May to October. The walk is 2.2 kilometres long on hard surface.

 

Flour Mill Museum

The museum is located in a house that originally belonged François Varieur, a foreman at Evans; Lumber. It was located next to the Flour Mill Silos but relocated in 1980 to St. Charles St. The museum opened in 1974 and celebrates the life and history of the Franco-Ontarian community in the Flour Mill area. In the log cabin next door, view a series of special exhibits. It is open from July 1 to Aug, 31: Wednesday through Sunday from 10 am. to 4 pm.(closed Monday and Tuesday). During May, June. September, October, it is open by appointment only. Admission is by donation.

245 St. Charles St.

705-674-4455 x4152

www.sudburymuseums.ca

 

Collège Boréal

In the late 1980s a group of community leaders began discussing the possibility of establishing a French-language college in Northern Ontario. Their dream was realized when the college’s main campus in Greater Sudbury was established in 1995. Collège Boréal is a French-language institution of post-secondary and skills-training. The college is a leader in the development of telecommunications infrastructure in educational institutes in Canada. Collège Boréal is one of only two exclusively French community colleges in the province with campus throughout Northern Ontario and satellite campuses in southern Ontario. The college offers a variety of programs including administration, management, animation, law and public security, computer studies, environmental studies, media and communication, health, hospitality and tourism, community services, trades, and technology.

21 Lasalle Blvd.

P3A 6B1

705.560.6673

 

Theatre du Nouvel Ontario (TNO)

TNO is a professional company that supports Franco-Ontarian authors in Ontario, as well as those in Canada, focusing on contemporary work. TNO is the first French-language theater outside of Canada to build its own theatre. In October 1997, the company officially opened, built at a cost of $1.8 million thanks to an innovative partnership with Collège Boréal in Sudbury. This partnership has enabled TNO to build an annex to 7,500 square feet the main building of the College, while benefiting from enormous economies of scale. TNO remains completely autonomous in its field, has a separate entrance and a display. Watch for information about TNO supertitles. On special evenings, productions have supertitles which allows English-only speakers to enjoy the innovative work performed at this theatre.

21 Lasalle Blvd.

705. 525.5606

 

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